Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Agenda, November 21

  • Due Now: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 - 28
  • Due Monday, 11/27: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 -30
  • Late: King Synthesis Essay. Do not choose not to do this.
  • Due Eventually: 10 entries in your curiosity journal. Each entry should include a question, an occasion (what sparked the question), and the beginnings of an answer. Sometimes the occasion will precede the question.
  Today's Agenda
  1. Five things you think
  2. Structural Rhetorical Analysis: Find the parts
  3. Structural Rhetorical Analysis: A paragraph per part

Monday, November 20, 2017

Agenda, November 20

  • Due Now: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 - 26
  • Due Tuesday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 27 & 28
  • Due Monday, 11/27: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 -30
  • Due Now: King Synthesis Essay
  • Due Eventually: 10 entries in your curiosity journal. Each entry should include a question, an occasion (what sparked the question), and the beginnings of an answer. Sometimes the occasion will precede the question.
  Today's Agenda
  1. Bad news: Beginning today, Mr. Kline's room will no longer be a cell phone charging station. Sorry.
  2. Go analyze yourself!
  3. Ch. 20, 22, 24
  4. Whole class disco

Friday, November 17, 2017

Agenda, November 17

  • Due Now: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 - 23
  • Due Monday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 25 & 26 (77 pages!)
  • Due Tuesday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 27 & 28
  • Late: Be prepared for a rhetorical devices quiz. 
  • Due Monday, November 20: King Synthesis Essay
  • Due Eventually: 10 entries in your curiosity journal. Each entry should include a question, an occasion (what sparked the question), and the beginnings of an answer. Sometimes the occasion will precede the question.
  Today's Agenda
  1. Bad news: Beginning Monday, Mr. Kline's room will no longer be a cell phone charging station. Sorry.
  2. More bad news: Brainyquotes, et al is not research. Sorry.
  3. Good news! Those things in the hall ...
  4. The moment you've all been waiting for ...
  5. Can I? Should I? Do I have to?
  6. Ch. 20-24
  7. Bibliographiesta!

Thursday, November 16, 2017

The Synthesis Checklist

Is it an argument?
Does it have a clear, complex claim?
Is the claim supported by logical reasons?
Are the reasons supported by convincing, sophisticated evidence?
Does the evidence come from an effective variety of sources?
Does the evidence come from college level resources?
Does it explore the subject thoroughly and draw reasonable conclusions?
 
Is the synthesis effective?
Do the synthesis paragraphs support the author’s opinion with direct quotations from two different sources?
Are the sources clearly established (author and author’s ethos, title, date of publication, purpose of source text, context of quotation)?
Are the quotations properly punctuated?
Is the analysis longer than the quotation?
Does the author avoid plagiarism, both intentional and accidental?
Are the non-synthesis paragraphs as thoroughly developed as the synthesis paragraphs?
 
Is it well organized?
Do the ideas come in the best order?
Are the transitions between ideas smooth and logical?
Is the opening precise, specific, and engaging? Is it the intro that only this author can write?
Are paragraphs fully developed with thoroughly analyzed examples?
Does the closing effectively emphasize, elaborate, or illuminate the author’s claim?
 
Is the language interesting?
Does the writer make precise, powerful diction choices?
Does the writer employ rhetorical strategies that engage the reader and emphasize the purpose?
Are appeals to ethos, pathos, and logos balanced, effective, and appropriate for audience and purpose?
Does the writer include a sufficient amount of showing?
Does the writer take risks?
 
Does this look like a college paper?
Does it follow MLA format?
Does it display a college-level control of spelling, grammar, and punctuation?
Did the writer meet the requirements of the assignment, including the nit-picky details?

Agenda, November 16

  • Due Now: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 - 23
  • Due Monday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 25 & 26 (77 pages!)
  • Due Tuesday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 27 & 28
  • Late: Be prepared for a rhetorical devices quiz. 
  • Due Monday, November 20: King Synthesis Essay
  • Due Eventually: 10 entries in your curiosity journal. Each entry should include a question, an occasion (what sparked the question), and the beginnings of an answer. Sometimes the occasion will precede the question.
  Today's Agenda
  1. Can I? Should I? Do I have to?
  2. 21 & 23 as essays
  3. Your New Best Friend
  4. Type a TEP

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Your new best friend: The TEP Paragraph

Technique – Effect – Purpose Paragraph

1. In “Title of Essay,” [author] uses [rhetorical strategy] to [achieve his purpose – do not use the word purpose in your paragraph; in your topic sentence, you should directly state what the author hopes to achieve.]

2. Establish the context of the first quotation.

3. Quote the text. Never use a quotation as its own sentence. When writing about diction, you might want to quote a “series” of “Words” or “phrases” instead of a complete sentence (Kline 22). Follow the quotation with the author’s name and the page number in parentheses. Artful writers might combine steps two and three in a single sentence. If you are not confident in your ability to properly format a quotation, visit this link for some excellent advice: http://www.virtualsalt.com/quotehlp.htm

4. Analyze the quotation. How does this help you prove the author’s technique achieves her purpose? Focus on the effect on the reader. NO MORE than two sentences of analysis.

5. Repeat steps two through four with a second example. The second example should show how the author develops or elaborates on the argument. When possible, use quotations from different parts of the essay. Use your examples in chronological order, unless there is a very clear reason not to.

6. Close your paragraph.

General Notes:
  • Strive for a formal tone.
  • No first or second person.
  • Don't evaluate the text. You just need to explain how it works.
  • Authors establish ethos, employ logos, and appeal to pathos.

Agenda, November 15

  • Due Now: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 1 - 19
  • Due Thursday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 21 & 23
  • Due Friday: The Grapes of Wrath, Chapters 25 & 26 (77 pages!)
  • Late: Be prepared for a rhetorical devices quiz. 
  • Due Monday, November 20: King Synthesis Essay
  • Due Eventually: 10 entries in your curiosity journal. Each entry should include a question, an occasion (what sparked the question), and the beginnings of an answer. Sometimes the occasion will precede the question.
  Today's Agenda
  1. Can I? Should I? Do I have to?
  2. How to Help a Friend
  3. Bibliography Notes
  4. Bibliography Work Time

Texts We've Read So Far


Texts we’ve read so far:
1.     I Have a Dream, by Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963)
2.     The Crucible, by Arthur Miller (1952)
3.      The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck (1939)

From 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology, 3rd Edition
4.     Just Walk on By: Black Men and Public Space, by Brent Staples (1986)
5.     The Joy of Reading: Superman and Me, by Sherman Alexie (1997)
6.     On Being a Cripple, by Nancy Mairs (1986)

From 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology, 2nd Edition
7.     How it Feels to Be Colored Me, by Zora Neale Hurston (1928)
8.     Lost in the Kitchen, by Dave Barry (1986)

From 100 Great Essays
9.     I Want a Wife, by Judy Brady (1971)

From The Prentice Hall Reader
10.  The Female Body, by Margaret Atwood (1983)

From The Language of Composition
11.  The Speech of Miss Polly Baker, by Benjamin Franklin (1747)

How to Help a Friend on the Bibliography Without Committing Plagiarism

When a classmate asks you for help with his or her Bibliography, you should ...
  1. never share your Bibliography or Works Cited with a classmate.
  2. never give a classmate a complete citation.
  3. remind your friend that the Bibliography Notes 2017 page exists. This page contains all the advice, models, and source information a person could ask for.
  4. give your friend the following information only, in this order: 
  • The title of the essay
  • The title of the anthology / source
  • The author of the essay
  • The page numbers of the essay
Remember, if you let a classmate copy your work - either intentionally or inadvertently - you are also guilty of plagiarism. The penalty for both the borrower and the lender is a 0 on the assignment and a referral.

Bibliography Notes 2017


 Ed Kline
Mr. Kline
AP Language and Composition
14 November 2017
Bibliography

1)    A Bibliography is a list of all texts consulted during the process of research. A Works Cited is a list of all works quoted in the essay. Each entry in a Bibliography or Works Cited is called a “citation.”
2)    Since a Bibliography stands alone, it needs the traditional MLA header on the first page. The Works Cited page does not need a header, and it should be stapled after the last page of your essay. Even if you have room to include your Works Cited on your last page, the Works Cited should be its own page. Yes, it’s a waste of paper. Sorry.
3)    Works Cited or Bibliography is centered at the top of the page. It is not highlighted, underlined, or quoted.
4)    Works are listed alphabetically by the first word in the citation, which is usually the author’s last name. Numbers are alphabetized before letters.
5)    Work is formatted with a hanging indent.
6)    Works Cited and Bibliography pages are double-spaced. Do not put an empty line / extra return between entries.
7)    Beware of using citation makers. Be sure to check any citations you’ve imported from a citation maker for accuracy.
8)    For sources from a database, omit the Location but include the Date of Access. From sources from the general web, include both Location and Date of Access.

Generic Format:

  1. Author.
Last name, First name.
Last name, First name, and First name Last name (for 2 authors).
Last name, First name, et al. for three or more authors.
  1. “Title of source.”

  1. Title of container,
If the source is the container (such as a novel, play, or film, italicize and follow with a period.
  1. Other contributors,

  1. Version,

  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Websites do not require a publisher.
  1. Publication date,
Use the most recent date for books. Look for a byline or a copyright on websites.
  1. Location.
URL for websites; page numbers for essays.
  1. Date of Access. (for websites only)
Accessed on Day Mon. Year.


Required Information for The Language of Composition:

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
The Language of Composition
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Renee H. Shea, Lawrences Scanlo, and Robin Dissin Aufses
  1. Version,
2nd ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Bedford / St. Martin’s
  1. Publication date,
2013
  1. Location.


Oates, Joyce Carol. “The Cruelest Sport.” The Language of Composition, edited by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, and Robin Dissin Aufses, 2nd ed., Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2013, pp. 622-31.
Required Information for 50 Essays, 3rd Edition

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
50 Essays: A Portable Anthology
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Samuel Cohen
  1. Version,
3rd ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Bedford / St. Martin’s
  1. Publication date,
2011
  1. Location.


Required Information for 50 Essays, 2nd Edition

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
50 Essays: A Portable Anthology
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Samuel Cohen
  1. Version,
2nd ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Bedford / St. Martin’s
  1. Publication date,
2007
  1. Location.



Required Information for 50 Essays, 1st Edition

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
50 Essays: A Portable Anthology
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Samuel Cohen
  1. Version,
1st ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Bedford / St. Martin’s
  1. Publication date,
2004
  1. Location.


Required Information for The Prentice Hall Reader:

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
The Prentice Hall Reader
  1. Other contributors,
edited by George Miller
  1. Version,
8th ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Pearson Education
  1. Publication date,
2007
  1. Location.


Required Information for 100 Great Essays:

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
100 Great Essays
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Robert DiYanni
  1. Version,
3rd ed.
  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Pearson Longman
  1. Publication date,
2008
  1. Location.



Required Information for Short Takes: Model Essays for Composition.

  1. Author.

  1. Title of source.

  1. Title of container,
Short Takes: Model Essays for Composition
  1. Other contributors,
edited by Elizabeth Penfield
  1. Version,

  1. Number,

  1. Publisher,
Pearson Longman
  1. Publication date,
2007
  1. Location.